Build Your Own R2D2 by De Agostini

Around Christmas there was an advert on TV by De Agostini to build your own R2D2 robot by buying magazines weekly. Each magazine would contain some information on  the Star Wars films and the props as well as parts to build the R2D2 robot. Check out the link below:

https://www.deagostini.com/uk/collections/build-your-own-R2-D2/

My partner kindly signed up to their subscription as you get various extras such as an R2D2 USB memory stick. Each magazine will cost around £9 so the total cost over the two year subscription will be about £900. I had a look online and couldn’t find anything really similar with the same features and size despite the cost.

A couple of weeks later the first two weeks magazines turned up. This page will document the build as and when the magazines arrive.

Week 1

This is how the first two magazines arrived. Inside the parts in encased in blister packs:

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Once opened, the contents looked like this:

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This is the week 1 pack with magazine including build instructions, parts and a flyer trying to persuade me to upgrade the subscription.

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Worryingly, on the back of the pack was a lbel stating the some screws would be missing and delivered at a later date but they were not needed yet (I hope they do turn up as per the label!)

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The instructions ask you to assemble an LED assembly with three screws and a connector:

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Use the included screwdriver to fit the LED assembly into the plastic housing. The screwdriver appears to be lightly magnetized but didn’t seem to work too well with the screw heads.

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Attach the cable assembly:

Then there are some spare parts for later use to keep safe. Total build time – just a couple of minutes:

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Week 2

Here are the contents for week 2. The silver parts are actually die cast metal and this gives it a quality feel:

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Attach the metal parts using the supplied screws

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Superglue these two pieces together

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A small dab of superglue (not supplied) is needed to glue these parts together.

The die cast metal part is then fitted to the plastic assembly.

This pin is then glued and attached to the rod and again glued to the metal rod.

Build time, again just a few minutes.

 

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Published by

pdclews

Lecturer in IT at East Berkshire College. Assessor & Verifier Technology Evangelist Hacker Tinkerer Collector of all things Retro Cyclist Kayaker Adventurer

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